Kelly 201: Serco’s Tencent DMORT Patents; Clinton’s Fresh Kills Body Count Buck, AD Letter of Marque

General John F. Kelly
White House Chief of Staff
Washington, D.C. 20528

Open letter from the Cloud Centric Crime Scene Investigators of Abel Danger

February 1, 2018

Dear General Kelly:

Please accept Brief 201 from Field McConnell – United States Marine Corps whistle-blower and Global Operations Director of Abel Danger (AD) – on Serco‘s CAI private-equity investors who have allegedly embedded Virtual Command Centers in the Disaster Mortuary Operational Response Team (DMORT) and FBI Law Enforcement Online (LEO) networks to direct patentee SWAT teams at mass-casualty events with Tencent’s Instant messaging [IM] system and method US 8566404 B2 and allow Clinton Foundation pay-to-play donors to bet on body counts with Howard Lutnick’s Real-time interactive wagering on event outcomes CA 2460367 A1.

McConnell claims Serco used Nortel’s Method for efficient management of certificate revocation lists and update information US 5699431 A to block the FBI investigations into body-count betting on 9/11 when Serco allegedly used Tencent’s IM to send JABS* data from DMORTs at the Fresh Kills landfill on Staten Island to junket operators including CAI investor, 7th SACEUR and former MGM Mirage and AOL director, the late Gen. Alexander Haig and former Marine Corps Captain, LEO founder and former Assistant FBI Director, Oliver “Buck” Revell.

JABS* – The Joint Automated Booking System allegedly built by Nortel Government Solutions for a secret society (Pride?) in the U.S. Department of Justice so that FBI or Interpol insiders can book felons and patentee SWAT teams into mass-casualty events; issue death certificate without bodies and enrich Serco‘s private-equity and junket investors including the late and allegedly treasonous Alexander Haig and his erstwhile friends in the Communist Party of China.

McConnell notes that “Buck” Revell is reported to have pulled his son and daughter-in-law off Pan Am Flight 103 just before takeoff from London’s Heathrow airport at 18:25 hours on 21 December 1988 and saved them from the bombing over Lockerbie, Scotland at 19:02:50 which generated a body count of 270 victims (243 passengers + 16 crew + 11 people on ground).

McConnell claims that Haig equipped Tencent’s Chinese junket investors and the Greek Life associates of Bill Clinton (Phi Beta Kappa) and Wilbur Ross (Kappa Beta Phi) with LEO Virtual Command Centers so they could deploy Serco SWAT teams to establish DMORT body counts for targeted entities such as the FDNY with 343 dead on 9/11 and ‘drift’ money into private accounts through subsequent Coordinated rebalancing by money manager portfolio management systems and a master overlay manager portfolio management system US 7729969 B1.

McConnell claims that Serco revoked the certificates needed by the FBI to investigate the appearance of body count betting at the MGM Mandalay Bay Hotel and Casino on October 1, 2017 when Serco SWAT teams killed 58 people with a Method [bump fire] of shooting a semi-automatic firearm US 8127658 B1 and destroyed evidence allegedly linking JABS, Tencent and Lutnick-wagering systems to the Interpol head and former Vice-minister and deputy head of China’s paramilitary police force, Meng Hongwei.

McConnell claims that Serco uses Buck Revell’s Imagis face recognition s/w to track actors and victims through the federal bridge certification authority network and, in re the shooting at the MGM Mandalay Hotel remind government leaders that while Clinton insiders may write SWAT team scripts, Serco (formerly RCA GB 1929) and its investment bankers control special weapons through the United States Patent and Trademark Office and therefore control the country itself!

Field McConnell invites you to convene a meeting with your cabinet colleagues and United States Marine Corps Major Duncan D. Hunter, Member of the U.S. House of Representatives from California’s 50th district, where McConnell can explain how Serco has embedded patentee SWAT teams into LEO and its predecessor networks to conceal insider messaging and wagering on times of victim deaths or body counts at such crime scenes as – to name just three – the remotely triggered bombings of Pan Am 103 on 21 December 1988, targets in New York and Washington DC on 9/11 and the bump-stock killings at the Mandalay Hotel on October 1, 2017.

After meeting with Congressman Hunter and your cabinet colleagues, McConnell will be asking Congress to authorize President Trump to issue a Presidential letter of Marque and Reprisal, which would allow him (McConnell) to recruit and lead an Abel Danger Marine Expeditionary Unit of about 100 veteran Marines to seize and take the assets of any patentee SWAT teams in the custody of Serco‘s private-equity groups (privateers), or shareholders or investment banker, N M Rothschild & Sons Ltd.

After the said assets have been transferred to the lawful custody of the United States’ government, McConnell’s MEU will begin to subdue the secret societies identified as Phi Beta Kappa and Kappa Beta Phi (founded 1776) which, we allege, have been blackmailing and extorting presidents of the United States with patentee SWAT-team attacks starting no later than the arson of the U.S. Patent Office in the USA Post Office, Blodget’s Hotel, Washington, on December 15, 1836 and continuing through pre-scripted body count attacks to the present day.

9/11 Alexander Haig Had Inside Knowledge Of The World Trade Center Bombing

Trump saw on 9/11/2001: bombs were used in WTC

Tracked by Imagis – Sold to Interpol – Bought by Serco!

There are TWO Londons & Why it MATTERS

SERCO GROUP PLC: List of Subsidiaries AND Shareholders! [Note agents for Northern Trust and the Teachers (TIAA) Pension Fund would have met with agents of the government of Saudi Arabia on the 47th floor of WTC 1 on 9/11]

Yours sincerely,

Field McConnell
USMC 0116513
P O Box 39
Plum City WI 54761″
+001-715-307-8222

“Digital Fires Instructor Serco – Camp Pendleton, CA Uses information derived from all military disciplines (e.g., aviation, ground combat, command and control, combat service support, intelligence, and opposing forces) to determine changes in enemy capabilities, vulnerabilities, and probable courses of action.”

“At Morgue, Ceaselessly Sifting 9/11 Traces
By DAN BARRY JULY 14, 2002
Outside the chalk-white tent, the whistle of traffic along the Franklin D. Roosevelt Drive signals the forward movement of a city. But inside, 16 refrigerated trailers hum in a ceaseless chorus, giving voice to the dead whose remains are contained in their hold.

The trailers hummed as time separated the city from the 11th of September: as the smoking mountain of what had been the World Trade Center became a yawning hole; as 1.6 million tons of debris were sifted through on a Staten Island landfill; as commemorative services caused heads to bow. They hummed and they continue to hum, a mantra-like reminder that talk of closure is premature.

The trailers’ contents are in the custody of Dr. Charles S. Hirsch, the chief medical examiner of New York City, who for 13 years has explained the city’s deaths to its living. His duties now include the historic challenge of trying to identify the nearly 20,000 body parts carried to his agency’s bleak, even forbidding building.

The human remains recovered at the disaster site and the landfill all came to an open-air bay on the East 30th Street side of the medical examiner’s building on First Avenue in Manhattan. In close and hectic surroundings, they were examined by a succession of experts — the pathologist, the forensic dentist, the fingerprint analyst, the DNA specialist — all in search of something distinguishable, from an inscribed wedding ring to a set of genetic markers.

The remains were then carried across 30th Street to the white tent, where they were received with a preacher’s brief prayer and then stored while others worked to try to attach a name to them.

Today, more than 10 months after the terrorist attack, the remains of 1,229 of the estimated 2,823 victims, or nearly 44 percent, have been identified through laboratory analyses, computer wizardry and old-fashioned detection. More than 500 identifications have been made through DNA alone: for one victim, nearly 200 pieces have been identified, while for others, there was a single shard of bone.

Amid the investigative swirl — of trying to match thousands of victims with six times as many body parts — the medical examiner’s office has made a few misidentifications. In one case, there was a folder mix-up. In another, a toothbrush collected for DNA was mislabeled.

“We are fallible,” Dr. Hirsch said. “But when we have made mistakes, we’ve modified our procedure to avoid repeating that mistake.”

The story of the medical examiner’s continuing response to Sept. 11 is largely unknown, partly because of Dr. Hirsch’s privacy concerns, and partly because of his office’s aura. It is, of course, the city morgue.

Many of his employees are so consumed by a mission with no clear end that they have barely reflected on their experiences. In recalling certain moments, several cried. A central part of their job, after all, is to tell all that they know, no matter how disturbing, to the victims’ relatives.

In an anteroom with a water-stained ceiling, people have asked where the remains of their loved ones were found. One staff member, Shiya Ribowsky, has had to jab his finger at a grid map of Lower Manhattan and gently say: “Here. And here. And here. And here.”

Usually, the people summoned to that sad little room have at least had something to bury. The remains of more than half the victims have not been identified, in part because hundreds died without leaving a trace. The hope is to identify 2,000 victims, or about 71 percent. “That’s been our whisper number around here,” Dr. Hirsch said.

Firsthand experience informs these tempered expectations; he was there when the first tower fell. Hours later, bloodied and bruised, he pulled from his pocket a fistful of pulverized concrete — a sign of all that had been reduced to dust. That dust, mixed with coins, rests now in a glass bowl on his desk.

Dr. Hirsch, 65, smokes a pipe and wears suspenders; he is fastidious and reserved. But when he discusses his office’s time-consuming efforts to identify the dead — which so far have cost $24 million — his emotions rise a tick or two. ”It’s important to people and we’re here to serve people,” he said. ”If a government can’t do that, what good is it?”

That is why the medical examiner’s office has begun to preserve the 16,000 body parts that have not been identified or returned to family members. One by one, the remains are being air-dried in a kind of giant dehumidification chamber to stem the decomposition and protect the DNA.

That is why Amy Zelson Mundorff was at her familiar post in the open-air bay the other day, examining a piece of a spine while others jotted notes. And why Dr. Zoran Budimlija was at a steel table beside her, scraping a piece of bone in search of material that might yield telltale DNA.

Their efforts were part of the agency’s resolve to re-examine every body part; as Mr. Ribowsky put it, ”to see September’s remains with July eyes.” The double-checking has already paid dividends in identification, the coin of the medical examiner’s isolated realm.

Ms. Mundorff recently found a mandible imbedded inside a torso. A discovery that might have caused gasps elsewhere elicited only cheers in an ugly building on First Avenue, where a hum is always at the door.

Danger in the ‘Kill Zone’

As soon as word arrived that a jetliner had struck the World Trade Center’s north tower, Dr. Hirsch and his colleagues prepared to receive the dead.

While other staff members set in motion a well-rehearsed disaster plan, Dr. Hirsch and six aides drove to the scene to establish a temporary morgue. And when the first tower roared and fell, shooting steel and concrete through the air, the doctor and his contingent found themselves well within the “kill zone.”

One investigator broke her leg so severely that the bone was exposed; another suffered a blow to the back of the head and took months to recover. Ms. Mundorff, 33 and barely 5 feet tall, was thrown headfirst into a wall. Dr. Hirsch was hurled to the ground, badly cutting his hand and bruising much of his reed-thin body.

Back at the office, staff members tried to sift fact from rumor. “We shut down 30th Street, got the refrigerated trucks coming, the forensic dentists arrived, and so on,” said David R. Schomburg, the director of medicolegal investigations. “But there were these rumors, false, of a ferry bound for Staten Island with 350 dead.”

His staff soon learned that Dr. Hirsch had survived, but still, the sight of him that afternoon was breathtaking. Covered from head to toe with white dust, he was a ghost with horrible stories to tell.

For his aides, it was an unforgettable moment. Here was Dr. Charles Hirsch, the man who had resurrected the country’s largest and busiest medical examiner’s office — handling more than 25,000 deaths and more than 700 homicides a year — from the mire of mismanagement; whose leadership had persuaded others to marry their career paths to his. Here he was, awed and covered with the dust of others.

“I had a surge of emotion that I can’t describe,” recalled Dr. Mark Flomenbaum, the first deputy chief medical examiner. “I’m in New York because he’s in New York. If he were in Chicago, I’d be in Chicago. It was horrible.”

Dr. Hirsch emptied his pockets and had a medical examiner’s epiphany. “If reinforced concrete was rendered into dust,” he said later, “then it wasn’t much of a mystery as to what would happen to people.”

It was evening before the first body arrived, one of the very few that would be found intact: the Rev. Mychal Judge, a Franciscan and the well-known New York Fire Department chaplain. His case was called DM-01-00001, with DM standing for Disaster Manhattan.

Mr. Ribowsky, now the deputy director of investigations, grabbed a thick ledger book and started to log descriptions and case numbers for the flood of body parts that was only beginning. ”Each piece had to be treated as its own person,” he said.

The book’s entries came to reflect the deluge of body parts that would last for many months. The seventh entry says “unk: male,” or “unknown”; the 18th, “left hand”; the 19th, ”body fragment.” There are rows of entries that say, simply, “unk: fragment — bone,” or “skeletal muscle.”

And when that book ran out of space more than four months later, on Jan. 22, the 13,486th entry was made — “unk: fragment — bone” — and a second book was begun. Its first entry, for the 13,487th body part, reads: ”unk: fragment — bone.”

The agency’s officials had put together an elemental but effective operation. An escort, usually a police officer, would be assigned to follow a body part as it passed before the eyes of a pathologist, a forensic dentist, a detective from the missing-persons bureau, a DNA analyst. It would not leave the escort’s sight until it was stored in one of the refrigerated trailers parked in the weed-covered lot that is known as Memorial Park.

The never-ending flow of remains shocked even the most experienced in death’s indignities.

“In one day,” Dr. Flomenbaum recalled, “I was seeing more homicides than in my 11 years in this office.”

Late that first night, stacks of dental charts, X-rays and photographs began to pile up in the lobby. They had been left by police officers, firefighters and others who thought that the medical examiner’s office could use them.

Follow the Forensic Trail

Then came what seemed like a timeless blur: of the unthinkable becoming mundane, of the constant engagement in what Dr. Hirsch calls the ”dialogue with the dead.” The nature of the disaster had already answered some of the basic questions that a medical examiner asks when standing over the dead, such as where and when the death had come. But, he said, there was still that first question: ”Who are you?”

People became obsessed with that question, among them Ms. Mundorff. The forensic anthropologist, her eyes blackened by her head injury, became the traffic director of a triage center that mushroomed onto East 30th Street. She examined every body part for something distinctive — an old fracture, a steel screw in a hip, a clothing label — sealed it in a bag, and wrote in indelible ink what she had found.

Then, she directed its escort where to go. For example, ”Table 1 needs a case,” she would say.

A few yards away, Dr. Jeff Burkes oversaw a team of forensic dentists who, whenever possible, were accounting for every tooth in a jaw, then creating new dental charts. As soon as dental charts that could be used for comparisons arrived, he said, “We got hits almost immediately, within hours.”

And down the corridor, as many as 40 people were jammed into a conference room, coordinating death certificates and fielding frantic calls from family members, while also trying to control the overflow of vital information. The noise in the small room would become so loud that Mr. Ribowsky occasionally called a timeout and asked everyone to take a long, relaxing breath.

Concentration was needed for the proper release of remains. “Somebody would have to go out and physically view the remains,” recalled Chuck Smith, a medical investigator who came from Baton Rouge, La., to help. “This was to make certain that what we were releasing was the same thing that was detailed on the intake sheet.”

The system was nearly flawless, but anything short of perfection meant pain for family members. Out of thousands there were three or four misidentifications, including the odd case of two firefighters from the same firehouse with the same anomaly in the same neck vertebra.

In another case, a forensic dentist gave the wrong folder to a person in the conference room. As a result, Dr. Hirsch said, “We changed the policy and required the sign-off of two dentists to make an identification.”

So much was being done for the first time that people joked that they were transforming a Cessna into a 747 — in flight. There was the assembly of a comprehensive database that, with a click of a mouse, could call up a photograph of a body part or show the latest conversation with a family member. There was the coordination of the services of hundreds of people summoned to New York by the federal program, Dmort, which is short for Disaster Mortuary Operational Response Teams. There was the start of a ground breaking practice to issue death certificates without bodies, eliminating a source of pain for grieving families.

All the while, the people of New York City continued to have fatal accidents, to kill one another, to die. In November, a jetliner crashed in the Rockaways, killing 265 people; Dr. Flomenbaum and the 31 medical examiners under his supervision were now handling two large-scale disasters on top of their normal workload.

“Death did not take a holiday otherwise,” Dr. Hirsch said.

But it was the World Trade Center disaster that never seemed to end. Trucks fresh from the disaster site and the landfill kept pulling up to the open bay, where the presence of police officers and firefighters — looking for lost friends — had long since breached the building’s traditional wall of dispassion.

“They knew these people,” Ms. Mundorff said. “They’d say, ‘Oh, he just got married,’ or ‘Oh, he has three kids.’ It’s not like this was Bosnia. This was our home turf, and it was hard.”

One day in the first month, Deputy Commissioner Thomas J. Brondolo took a walk. He had not left the medical examiner’s office since the disaster — except to sleep in his car — and now he saw for the first time the photographs of the missing that covered the walls and windows of the city. They were snapshots, from vacations and weddings, of the people now coming to his place of business in pieces the color of earth.

“The farther and farther I got from the office,” he said, “the harder and harder it became.”

DNA Takes Time and Patience

For a while, patience was about all that the DNA specialists on the sixth floor could bring to their agency’s mission. To make identifications, they had to compare the DNA being extracted from the body parts with DNA taken from the victims’ personal effects or their blood relatives. The collection of that material took time.

The nature of the disaster also complicated matters. “It was like a huge mortar and pestle,” Dr. Robert Shaler, the director of forensic biology, said. “There were many, many small fragments, commingled remains, many pieces from a single person.”

While the state police set out to collect things to compare — from toothbrushes to cheek swabs — Dr. Shaler worked the telephone to find the best databases and analysts in the country. A first-generation computer system was set up and, on Oct. 24, the medical examiner made its first identification through DNA.

But by early January, Dr. Shaler received confirmation that the chaotic nature of the collection process in the first days had created doubt about the usefulness of the samples.

To ease the pain and confusion for relatives being asked again to provide DNA samples and personal items, the medical examiner established a DNA hot line that allowed them to check on the status of their loved one’s case. So far the hot line has received more than 6,300 calls.

More than 5,000 cheek swabs have been taken from blood relatives, and more than 15,000 personal articles have been collected. Some items, like a victim’s teddy bear or pillow case, have been of no value, while others — including 1,400 toothbrushes, 140 razors and 126 hairbrushes — have yielded valuable DNA.

Today, the responsibility for making further identifications in the most ambitious forensic investigation in history rests almost entirely with Dr. Shaler and his staff. “Here on out,” Dr. Hirsch said, “any additional identifications will likely be exclusively DNA.”

Assistance is coming from across the country. In Springfield, Va., the Bode Technology Group is pulverizing bone samples to extract DNA. In Rockville, Md., the Celera Genomics Group is trying to trace the maternally inherited DNA from the remains. In Dallas, the GeneScreen division of Orchid Biosciences Inc., will be analyzing DNA samples that have so far yielded nothing.

But the work also continues in the medical examiner’s DNA laboratory. There, on a recent day, boxes of bones lined the wall of a walk-in cooler, boxes of personal effects were stacked in the hall, and binders with labels like “Bone/Teeth/Hair” and “Muscle/Soft Tissue” lined book shelves. In one corner, technicians were reading data from a sophisticated computer system that did not exist on Sept. 11, while in another corner, a robotic machine processed liquefied profiles of DNA.

And on a counter sat a plastic tube, inside of which was a small piece of bone and tissue, just recovered at the landfill. Preparations were already being made to somehow unlock its mysteries.

Families Are Grateful

The mysteries of death can prey on the minds of those who lost loved ones in the World Trade Center collapse. They have struggled with loss, waded through months of misinformation and, in many cases, been denied the age-old ritual of burying the dead.

But Jennie Farrell, a leader of a family group called Give Your Voice, said that many have been heartened by the unvarnished facts provided by perhaps the most daunting government agency in the city, the medical examiner’s office. “There’s a sense of comfort when you’re given the information that you need,” she said.

Several months ago, in November, Dr. Hirsch was heckled during a meeting with family members, who thought it was insensitive of him to say that many victims had been vaporized. Now, Ms. Farrell said, his agency is widely applauded for its dealings with family members: gently explaining the drying-out process, sharing hopes for DNA breakthroughs, giving choices about when — or if — to be notified when another piece of a loved one is identified.

Most of all, she said, the agency provides details that demystify.

When an identification is made, the family members are escorted to that room off the lobby and told that there are difficult things to discuss. They usually jot down every word in notebooks, and they often ask whether their loved one jumped from a window, or was burned by fire. Sometimes they have preconceived stories — of a husband dying while rescuing others — for which they seek confirmation.

“There is this kind of surrealness,” said Katie Sullivan, a member of D.M.O.R.T. from Portland, Ore., who has counseled more than 100 families. “We’ll bring out the grid of the site, they’ll be taking notes. And in a couple of minutes we’re talking about this horrible, unthinkable event, and what happened to the bodies after they died. You kind of float out of yourself sometimes.”

She added, quoting Dr. Hirsch, ”But we’re the caretakers of their information.”

It is unclear what will happen to the many remains never identified, or claimed. It is likely that they will be interred beneath a memorial of some kind. For now, there is a prayer service every Friday afternoon for family members under that tent just off the F.D.R. Drive.

On a recent Friday, with rain beating down against the chalk-white canvas, two preachers led half-dozen people in prayer. Then a clerk from the medical examiner’s office sang a hymn, his powerful voice soaring above the pervasive hum.

At the end of the service, the preachers asked people to place lighted lanterns at the foot of each of the 16 trailers. The medical examiner for the City of New York did as he had been asked, then disappeared as quietly as he had entered.”

“A Disaster Mortuary Operational Response Team or DMORT is a team of experts in the fields of victim identification and mortuary services. DMORTs are activated in response to large scale disasters in the United States to assist in the identification of deceased individuals and storage of the bodies pending the bodies being claimed.

In the 1980s, the National Funeral Directors Association (NFDA) formed a committee to address the need for a way of dealing with mass casualty situations. The group had the goal of formulating a plan for funeral directors to deal with the situation. As the committee worked on the plan, it was revealed that such a situation would call for multiple forensic specialties. The committee created the first portable morgue unit in the country.[2]

The committee’s work came to the attention of the Federal Government following the complaints of families whose family members had been lost in airline incidents. The families felt that the remains hadn’t received adequate treatment. The United States Congress passed the Family Assistance Act in 1996.[2] The National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) was assigned the role of managing the Federal response to aviation disaster victims and their families. The division responsible for this response was the Office of Family Affairs, later renamed the Office of Transportation Disaster Assistance. The NTSB made use of DMORTs to handle large scale transportation disasters.”

Serco Processes 2 Millionth Patent Application for U.S. Patent and Trademark Office
March 19, 2013 RESTON, VIRGINIA – March 18, 2013 – Serco Inc., a leading provider of professional, technology, and management services to the federal government, announced today that their Pre-Grant Publication (PGPubs) Classification Services team recently processed their 2 millionth patent application for the U.S. Patent & Trademark Office (USPTO). Each application was also processed within the contractually required 28-day window.”

“Instant messaging system and method
US 8566404 B2

ABSTRACT
Methods and apparatuses for processing an instant message from a source wireless communication device to a destination device are described herein. In one aspect of the invention, an exemplary method includes receiving the instant message from the source wireless communication device, the instant message having a source wireless communication identifier, a destination instant messenger identifier, and data contents; extracting the source wireless communication identifier, the destination instant messenger identifier and the data contents from the instant message; retrieving a source instant messenger identifier corresponding to the source wireless communication identifier; binding the source instant messenger identifier with the source wireless communication identifier; and transmitting the data contents with the source instant messenger identifier to the destination device over a communication network, based on the destination instant messenger identifier. Other methods and apparatuses are also described.

Publication number: US8566404 B2
Publication type: Grant
Application number: US 12/414,510
Publication date: Oct 22, 2013
Filing date: Mar 30, 2009
Priority date: Mar 26, 2001
Fee status: Paid
Also published as: US7512407, 11 More »
Inventors: Xiaoguang Wu, Yang Chen, Yejun Huang, Huateng Ma, Liqing Zeng
Original Assignee: Tencent (Bvi) Limited
Export Citation: BiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
Patent Citations (33), Non-Patent Citations (20), Referenced by (3),Classifications (18), Legal Events (2)
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet”

“Real-time interactive wagering on event outcomes
US 8512129 B2
ABSTRACT
Systems and methods for real-time interactive wagering on event outcomes are presented. Clients are first qualified and given wagering limits before being allowed to interactively wager on event outcomes. Event outcomes may be based on, for example, financial markets and indices, sporting and entertainment events, casino performances, and natural phenomena such as weather and earthquakes. Events on which wagers can be placed include both those with known and unknown outcome probabilities, and wagers can be a fixed-odds type or a spread-bet type. Wager transactions, including acceptances and confirmations, are executed in real time. Clients can customize displays of events on which they are authorized to wager. Real-time client credit management, automatic dealer hedging, automatic price-spread adjustments, and automatic client and dealer defined wagering limits are also provided.

Publication number: US8512129 B2
Publication type: Grant
Application number: US 09/846,025
Publication date: Aug 20, 2013
Filing date: Apr 30, 2001
Priority date: May 1, 2000
Fee status: Paid
Also published as: CA2407679A1, 17 More »
Inventors: Philip M Ginsberg, Andrew C Gilbert, Howard W Lutnick, Lewis Findlay
Original Assignee: Cfph, Llc
Export Citation: BiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
Patent Citations (181), Non-Patent Citations (83), Referenced by (5),Classifications (16), Legal Events (3)”

“Pansy Ho Chiu King, co-chairperson of Macau casino operator MGM China Holdings Ltd, said the firm would focus on the quality of its customers at the new property MGM Cotai (pictured), a casino resort built with facilities that can cater to “any sorts of events”. Ms Ho additionally said that she does not expect the firm’s VIP business to be cannibalised by other gaming operators, as the Cotai property nears completion. MGM China said in September that its under-construction casino resort on Cotai is on target to open on January 29, 2018. That is more than one year later than outlined in the original timetable presented by the company. The company currently operates a single property, MGM Macau, in the city’s traditional downtown casino district. The company’s chief executive Grant Bowie told Hong Kong media on Monday that the firm plans to have five junket operators at MGM Cotai, which could help with the ramp up of the new property. Mr Bowie had previously mentioned during a conference call on the firm’s third-quarter results that MGM Cotai would initially open offering only “in-house VIP” gaming; but the firm had a programme to add junkets “as quickly as” it could.”

“New Interpol head is Chinese former deputy head of paramilitary police force
Vice-minister Meng Hongwei’s election has sparked concerns his position may be used to boost China’s campaign to pursue dissidents around the globe
Benjamin Haas in Hong Kong
Thu 10 Nov 2016 07.17 GMTFirst published on Thu 10 Nov 2016 06.50 GMT
A Chinese security official has been elected head of the global police organization Interpol, sparking fears the move may be used to track down dissidents as well as alleged fugitives who have fled abroad.

Meng Hongwei, vice minister for public security since 2004 and the first Chinese to hold the post, will serve as president for four years after he was elected at an Interpol meeting in Indonesia, the agency announced on Twitter.

“This is extraordinarily worrying given China’s longstanding practice of trying to use Interpol to arrest dissidents and refugees abroad,” Nicholas Bequelin, east Asia director at Amnesty International, said on Twitter.

“The Chinese police have a terrible human rights record, including the endemic practice of coercing ‘confessions’ and the widespread use of torture,” Bequelin said separately in an interview.

“Unlike most law enforcement agencies around the world, the Chinese police have – in addition to the classic law and order mandate – a political mandate to protect the power of the Communist party.”

Meng was previously deputy director of China’s armed police, a paramilitary force that is often deployed to the country’s most unstable areas, including Tibet, the border with North Korea and the far western province of Xinjiang.

Li Wei, head of the anti-terrorism centre at China Institute of Contemporary International Relations, said: “As the head of Interpol, Meng Hongwei will deepen the fight against transnational crime.”

“Tencent Holdings Limited (Chinese: 腾讯控股有限公司; pinyin: Téngxùn Kònggǔ Yǒuxiàn Gōngsī; literally: “Soaring information”; SEHK: 700) is a Chinese multinational investment holding conglomerate whose subsidiaries specialize in various Internet-related services and products, entertainment, AI and technology both in China and globally.[4] Its twin-skyscrapers headquarters Tencent Seafront Towers (also known as Tencent Binhai Mansion) are based in Nanshan District, Shenzhen, and has received several awards for its architecture.[5]

Tencent is the world’s biggest investment corporation, one of the largest Internet and technology companies, as well as the largest and most valuable gaming and social media company in the world. It is one of the top 5 biggest firms in the world. Its many services include social network, music, web portals, e-commerce, mobile games, internet services, payment systems, smartphones, and multiplayer online games, which are all among the world’s biggest and most successful in their respective categories.[6] Offerings in China include the well-known instant messenger Tencent QQ and one of the largest web portals, QQ.com.[7] Its mobile chat service WeChat has helped bolster Tencent’s continued expansion into smartphone services, and has been credited as one of the world’s most powerful apps.[8] It also owns majority of China’s music services (Tencent Music Entertainment), with more than 700 million active users and 120 million paying subscribers, the world’s largest and most profitable.[9][10][11][12]

As of January 2018, the company has a market value of US$580 billion (HK$4.48 trillion), and is Asia’s most valuable company, with continued revenue growth, massive user base and investments into new areas. It maintained an exceedingly high buy rating of 98% from stock watchers, credited to its bullish outlook.[13] It is the first Asian company to cross the US$500 billion valuation mark, while surpassing Facebook in market value on 20 November 2017, and became the world’s most valuable social media company.[14][15][16][17][18] Tencent has been credited as one of the world’s most innovative companies by numerous media and firms, such as Boston Consulting Group.[19][20][21][22][23][24]

Tencent controls hundreds of subsidiaries and associates in numerous industries and areas, creating a broad portfolio of ownerships and investment across a diverse range of businesses including e-commerce, retail, video gaming, real estate, software, virtual reality, ride-sharing, banking, financial services, fintech, consumer technology, computer technology, automobile, film production, movie ticketing, music production, space technology, natural resources, smartphones, big data, agriculture, medical services, cloud computing, social media, IT, advertising, streaming media, artificial intelligence, robotics, UAVs, food delivery, courier services, e-book, internet services, education and renewable energy.[25] It is one of the most active investment corporations in the world, with recent focus on start-ups within Asia’s burgeoning tech scene.[26][27][28]”

“But it is in China that Haig has carved out a special niche as a door opener for American companies. The general has been a steadfast advocate for China ever since he led the advance team for President Nixon’s historic 1972 visit. Later, as secretary of state, he earned the respect of the Chinese leadership by holding fast against the powerful Taiwan lobby in Washington. (He saw China as a useful ally in the struggle against the Soviet Union.) Haig continues to speak out for Beijing in his present role. Perhaps the most striking example came when he turned up at Tiananmen Square on October 1, 1989 — four months after the notorious crackdown — to mark the 40th anniversary of the founding of the People’s Republic. The only American to grace the proceedings that evening, Haig knew that the United States and all other Western ambassadors would be boycotting the event, but he shared the podium with Chinese leader Deng Xiaoping, who congratulated him on his courage in appearing.

“Oliver ‘Buck’ Revell is the FBI‘s former Assistant Director who spent 30 years working his way up to the highest rank in career government service. Upon Buck Revell’s retirement in 1994, he founded Revell Group International (RGI), a global network of former senior FBI, security service, intelligence, diplomatic, law enforcement and military officials with a broad range of international business and technical experience.[1]Revell graduated from East Tennessee State University and got his Masters from Temple University in Public Administration. He served four years in the Marines as an aviator and left as a Captain.[2] ….

Buck Revell began his career in the FBI in November 1964. He recently published a book entitled G-Man’s Journal to chronicle his experiences in the FBI from the Kennedy assassination to the 1995 Oklahoma City bombing from an insider’s point of view. Revell served in the Kansas City, Philadelphia and Tampa Divisions of the FBI and at FBI Headquarters (FBIHQ) in the Organized Crime Section, the Inspection Division and the Office of Planning and Evaluation. In January 1975, Revell was promoted to Assistant Special Agent in charge of the Chicago Division, and later as Acting Special Agent in Charge. In October 1976, Revell was promoted to Senior Executive Service (SES) rank and designated Inspector and Executive Assistant to the Associate Director at FBIHQ. In November 1977, he was designated Special Agent in Charge of the Oklahoma Division. In August 1979, Revell was designated Deputy Assistant Director, Criminal Investigative Division, FBIHQ, where he directed the FBI’s programs in Organized Crime, White Collar Crime, Official Corruption and Undercover Operations. In June 1980, he was promoted to Assistant Director and placed in charge of the Criminal Investigative Division, making him responsible for the criminal investigative and counter-terrorism programs and operations of the FBI.

In January 1981, Assistant Director Revell was placed in charge of the Administrative Services Division where he was responsible for Personnel, Budget, Finance and Physical and Personnel Security Operations of the FBI. In May 1982, Revell was again placed in charge of the Criminal Investigative Division and given the additional responsibility of planning and implementing the FBI’s newly acquired drug enforcement jurisdiction. In July 1985, Revell was promoted to Executive Assistant Director – Investigations (SES-6) the highest rank in career government service. He served as the Director’s deputy in charge of Criminal Investigative, Counter-Terrorism and Counter-Intelligence activities. He was also responsible for international investigative and liaison activities of the Bureau, including its Legal Attaché and INTERPOL operations.[3]

Senior positions

In July 1989, his title was changed to Associate Deputy Director – Investigations and oversight of the Training and Laboratory Divisions of the FBI were added to his responsibilities. As a member (1982-1991) of the President’s Council on Integrity and Efficiency, he was Chairman of the Council’s Committee on Integrity and Law Enforcement. He served on the Attorney General’s Economic Crime Council and as Chairman, INTERPOL Conference on International Financial Crime in Cannes. He was a member of the National Foreign Intelligence Board, the Terrorist Crisis Management Committee and the Group on Narcotics. He served as Vice Chairman of the Interagency Group/Counterintelligence. In 1985, he was a member of the Senior Review Group of the Vice President’s Task Force on Terrorism. He served as a U.S. delegate to the United Nations International Conference on Drug Abuse and Illicit Trafficking in Vienna.

Revell was a member of the Senior Policy Group of the Vice President’s Task Force on Border Control Issues in 1988; he also served as an Adviser to the President’s Commission on Aviation Security and Terrorism which was established in 1989 “to investigate the events surrounding the destruction of Pan Am Flight 103“. He was a member of “The Executive Session on Policing”, Kennedy School of Government, Harvard University, 1987-1991.

Lockerbie bombing

Disaster warning

On 21 December 1988, shortly before Pan Am Flight 103 took off from London’s Heathrow airport at 18:25 hours, FBI Assistant Director Oliver “Buck” Revell reportedly rushed out onto the tarmac and pulled his son and daughter-in-law off the plane. The Lockerbie bombing was not the first time authorities were warned of an impending terrorist attack. The situation would repeat itself five years later in New York City, and seven years later in Oklahoma. It was an all too eerie coincidence.

Typically, U.S. authorities disingenuously denied receiving any warnings, as they would later do in New York and Oklahoma. Yet, as in those cases, evidence of prior knowledge would eventually become known. “It subsequently came to me on further inquiries that they hadn’t ignored [the warnings],” said a Pan Am security officer. “A number of VIPs were pulled off that plane. A number of intelligence operatives were pulled off that plane.”

Due to the warnings posted in U.S. embassies by the State Department (but not forwarded to Pan Am), many government employees avoided the flight. In fact, the Boeing 747 jumbo jet was only two-thirds full that busy holiday evening. South African president P W Botha and several high-ranking officials were advised by state security forces to change their reservations at the last hour. The South African State Security forces have a close relationship with the CIA.

Just as they would do in Oklahoma, government officials promised a complete and thorough investigation. Stated Oliver “Buck” Revell, who headed up the Bureau’s Lockerbie investigation:

“All of us working on the case made it a very, very personal priority of the first order.”

Fronting for the CIA, Vincent Cannistraro chimed in:

“I had personal friends on that plane who died. And I assure you that I wanted to find the perpetrators of that disaster as much as anyone wanted to.”

As in Oklahoma City, this would become the catch-all phrase that would set everything right and prove the government had no involvement. Of course, this would be somewhat difficult in Revell’s case, since he pulled his son and daughter-in-law off the plane minutes before it took off. (This was suspiciously reminiscent of the ATF agents who were paged not to come into work on April 19.)

Interestingly, Revell was the FBI’s lead investigator in the crash of an Arrow Air DC-8 which exploded on 12 December 1985 in Gander, Newfoundland, with the loss of all 248 personnel. As in Oklahoma City, that site was quickly bulldozed, destroying crucial forensic evidence, with an Army official maintaining a watchful eye at all times. Hiding behind the cover-up was the same cast of characters — Oliver North, Duane Clarridge, and Vince Cannistraro — who was North’s deputy at the NSC during Iran-Contra, and would later appear in Lockerbie. The same cast of characters that lurked behind the scandals in Nicaragua and Iran, and would appear like ghostly apparitions in the smoldering ruins of Oklahoma City.

It was also an act that the U.S. Shadow Government, responsible for precipitating, was anxious to cover up. Had the true cause of the crash — North’s double-dealing with the Iranians — been revealed, the Iran-Contra scandal would have surfaced two years before it did.

Oliver “Buck” Revell would be on hand to make sure it didn’t.

Three years later, in Lockerbie, the government was still claiming its hands were clean. Yet it vigorously protested Pan Am’s attempts to subpoena warning memos and other documents that would have revealed the government’s foreknowledge, just as it did in Oklahoma.

Simply stated, the attack on Pan Am 103 was in retaliation for the downing of the Iranian airbus.[4]

“The NCIC database currently consists of seventeen files. The seven property files contain records of stolen articles, boats, guns, license plates, parts, securities, and vehicles. The ten person files are the Convicted Person on Supervised Release, Convicted Sexual Offender Registry, Foreign Fugitive, Immigration Violator, Missing Person, Protection Order, Unidentified Person, U.S. Secret Service, Violent Gang and Terrorist Organization, and Wanted Person Files. The Interstate Identification Index, which contains automated criminal history record information, is also accessible through the NCIC network.

Now, I would like to outline some of the NCIC files and features that assist in immigration and border security. The Foreign Fugitive File, established July 1, 1987, contains information on persons wanted in connection with offenses committed outside the United States. There are two types of records in the Foreign Fugitive File: Canadian records and International Criminal Police Organization (otherwise known as INTERPOL) records. Canadian records contain information on persons wanted for violations of the criminal code of Canada based upon Canada-wide warrants. INTERPOL records contain information on persons wanted by authorities in other countries. The INTERPOL National Central Bureau of any country may issue a wanted flyer, known as a red notice, for a fugitive wanted within its respective country. The red notice requests the arrest of the fugitive with the intention that extradition will occur. Upon receipt of a red notice, the United States INTERPOL National Central Bureau reviews the information and enters an NCIC Foreign Fugitive File record if the following conditions are met: 1) the wanting country has an outstanding arrest warrant that charges a crime which would be a felony if committed in the United States; and 2) the wanting country is a signatory to an extradition treaty/convention with the United States. On October 29th, there were 1,543 records in the Foreign Fugitive File.”

“UK’s Crime Squad picks face-recognition tech
December 3, 2001 Posted: 9:07 a.m. EST (1407 GMT)
LONDON, England (IDG) — Imagis Technologies Inc. and Serco Group PLC are working with the UK’s National Crime Squad (NCS) to develop a facial-recognition application for use in crime fighting.

The squad is working on a national database based on Imagis ID-2000 facial-recognition technology to use as a tool for keeping track of convicted pedophiles and other criminals, Imagis announced at the Biometrics 2001 Conference here on Thursday.

“We are working with both Imagis and Serco on the technology,” an NCS spokesman confirmed.

UK-based Serco is a management and consulting company that has been providing IT support to the U.K. government and the NCS, a government agency, for a number of years. The Canadian Imagis Technologies is a developer of image-identification software with a focus on biometric facial recognition, according to the company’s Web site.

Financial terms of the deal were not disclosed.

The Imagis’ ID-2000 was picked for further development by the UK government for its ability to identify an individual within very large databases of images in seconds, its ability to search for common background scenes as well as faces, its use imagery from any source, including live video as well as digital and analog photos and the security built into the program that allows for the secure transmission of data even from remote databases, Imagis said in a statement that was vetted and approved by the NCS.

The software will aid law-enforcement agencies in identifying victims and perpetrators as well as background imagery for criminal investigation and case preparation, Imagis said.

Already being used by the NCS, the facial-recognition technology is playing a part in the ongoing investigation into an online pedophile group which on Wednesday led to the arrest of 130 people worldwide, 10 in the UK, Imagis said.

The software is also being looked into as a tool for the fight against international terrorism, an NCS spokesman said.

In October, a U.S. Senate subcommittee began looking into the possible future use of cutting-edge devices such as facial-recognition monitors and retinal scanners as a way to combat terrorism following the attacks in New York and Washington D.C. on September 11.

The Imagis ID-2000 facial-recognition technology is also currently being used by the Oakland Police Department (OPD), in Oakland, California throughout Alameda County, including the Oakland International Airport, the OPD and Imagis announced in October.”

“NEWS RELEASE
API Technologies to Purchase Casino-ID Software Application from
Facial Recognition Developer, Imagis Technologies

Vancouver, Canada – November 6, 2001: Imagis Technologies Inc. (OTCBB: IGSTF; CDNX: NAB; Germany: IGY),a leading biometric facial recognition company, today announced that API Technologies LLC will purchase the rights to Imagis’ Casino-ID product and will pay royalty fees to Imagis associated with API product sales that incorporate the Casino-ID software application. Casino-ID is an advanced software application for tracking incident-based information and images within the Casino environment.

API President, Dennis Nelson, said, “Having marketed Casino-ID since May 2001, it has become apparent that it goes far beyond existing gaming applications. By offering features and an array of functions that are not currently available, Casino-ID is in strong demand by the industry. In this heightened security environment, the use of Imagis’ facial recognition technology, ID-2000, together with Casino-ID, allows us to screen and track the movements of all staff, visitors and vendors. The Casino-ID solution will allow our gaming clients to create an enhanced security environment adding safety, comfort and peace of mind to the gaming entertainment experience.”

Casino-ID software captures, stores, and matches surveillance images quickly and easily. By cataloging intelligence data it identifies suspects and potential risks to protect gaming facility staff, clients and property. The purchase of the Casino-ID application will allow API Technologies to make enhancements to the software that will further increase the effectiveness of the product for Casino Managers.

Helena Campbell, formerly a Regional Sales Director for Imagis, has joined API Technologies as Vice President, Market Development. API plans to market the Casino-ID product line through its direct sales force and through its existing business partners within the gaming industry. API Technologies plans to integrate a comprehensive and functional gaming security database within Casino-ID and make it available to its customers.

Iain Drummond, Imagis Technologies’ President & CEO, said, “We see this as a truly synergistic partnership that will accelerate the adoption of Casino-ID by the gaming industry while providing Imagis with recurring revenues from royalty fees. This will allow Imagis to focus on the major opportunities in the airport, law enforcement, and security markets.

About IMAGIS

Imagis (OTCBB: IGSTF; CDNX: NAB; Germany: IGY) is a developer and marketer of software applications and advanced biometric facial recognition software solutions both as products and as a Software Development Kit. These applications provide a range of security solutions in various industry sectors including airports, law enforcement, customs, immigration and other government agencies, and gaming. Imagis currently has over 130 national and international installations within excess of a thousand users of its biometric facial recognition technology, including at Toronto’s Pearson International Airport, the world’s 16th busiest airport and Oakland International Airport, which serves more than 10 million travelers per year, and several installations throughout Canada, Mexico, and the UK. Imagis markets its products through a network of business partners located in North America, Asia, Europe and Latin America. Imagis’ Chairman is Oliver “Buck” Revell, who served for over 30 years in the FBI, and during his career advanced to the number two-career post of Associate Deputy Director. Imagis is on the web at http://www.imagistechnologies.com.

1300 – 1075 W. Georgia
Vancouver, BC Canada V6E 3C9
Tel: (604) 684-2449 Fax: (604) 684-4601
email: sandy@imagistechnologies.com

About API Technologies, LLC.

Since its inception in 1975, API Services Inc. has earned a reputation for consistently providing their local, regional, national and international clients with successful solutions to their security and personnel challenges. API is one of North America’s leading gaming consulting firms, specializing in security and protection services, systems design, regulatory and facility development, internal controls, business due diligence and start up consulting to the gaming industry. As a result of the extremely positive response to the Casino-ID product in the market place, API Technologies, LLC was established to further promote and expand its product line. API Technologies will integrate the “best in class” Biometric Technology – Casino-ID, with its 25 years of consulting experience to provide a comprehensive solution to the gaming marketplace.”

“Nevada Gaming Commission OKs record $5.5 million fine against CG Technology
By CHRIS SIEROTY LAS VEGAS REVIEW-JOURNAL
January 23, 2014 – 6:44 pm
The Nevada Gaming Commission on Thursday unanimously approved a record $5.5 million fine levied against the race and sports book subsidiary of Cantor Fitzgerald L.P. related to illegal bets by a top executive.

“Today is a bad day,” Commissioner Tony Alamo said. “This is an enormously large sum of money. This is a revenue get. That’s not our goal. Our goal is to punish” those who violate state gaming regulations.

Alamo credited CG Technology’s CEO Lee Amaitis for attending the hearing but cautioned him that this incident was national news and “gave Nevada a black eye.” Alamo said he wouldn’t want to see CG Technology come before the commission for a similar incident in the future.

“I am not afraid of revocation” of a company’s license,” Alamo said.

Chairman Peter Bernhard said he was initially reluctant to support the stipulation because of the damage done to the industry by the company. But Bernhard eventually supported it because it is the largest fine ever against a gaming company. He said the $5.5 million fine sends a message that “people will be held accountable.”

The three-member Nevada Gaming Control Board could have also recommended revoking or suspending CG Technology’s license.

Amaitis attended the hearing but did not address the commission. He also declined to comment on the commission’s decision following the 20-minute hearing.

The Gaming Control Board’s 18-count compliant outlining the charges against CG Technology, formerly Cantor Gaming, was made public Jan. 8. The settlement was released Jan. 13.

In the complaint, regulators said CG Technology failed to prevent Michael Colbert from operating an illegal sports betting ring that made an estimated $34 million in bets. Colbert, formerly risk management director and vice president of the former Cantor Gaming in Las Vegas, worked with three men who worked as messengers to place wagers for Gadoon Kyrollos, a high-level sports bettor.

Paul Sexton, Robert Drexler and Thomas Ludford acted as messenger bettors, according to the complaint. Sexton pleaded guilty to fourth-degree money-laundering and forfeited $600,000.

In 2013, Colbert pleaded guilty in federal court in New York to one felony count of conspiracy for his role in the betting ring. He awaits sentencing.

The settlement says CG Technology admitted guilt in 14 counts of the complaint and concurred that the board could prove one count directly relating to Colbert’s oversight of the illegal wagering operation. The company did not admit or deny allegations in three other counts.

Both Amaitis and Cantor Fitzgerald Chairman Howard Lutnick signed off on the settlement.

Before the CG Technology fine, the largest fine ever approved by Nevada gaming regulators was $5 million in 2003 against MGM Mirage, now MGM Resorts International. The company was fined for failing to file 15,000 currency transaction reports with the Internal Revenue Service.

Owners of the Stardust paid a $3 million fine in 1984 to settle a complaint over allegations that the now-imploded Strip casino’s former owner failed to prevent mob-related skimming of gaming revenue.

In 1988, Ralph Engelstad, late owner of the Imperial Palace, was accused of damaging the state’s reputation for holding two Adolf Hitler birthday parties at the casino in separate years. He paid a $1.5 million fine.

The Palms paid a $1 million fine in 2013 to settle a complaint resulting from an investigation that discovered drug sales and prostitution at clubs on the property.

Cantor Fitzgerald, founded in 1945, is one of the largest private financial services firms on Wall Street. Lutnick has led the company’s expansion over the past decade into investment banking, commercial real estate and gaming.

CG Technology operates race and sports books at the M Resort, Hard Rock Hotel, Tropicana Las Vegas, The Cosmopolitan of Las Vegas, The Venetian, Palms and Silverton, and provides information as Las Vegas Sports Consultants and offers mobile wagering.

The bookmaker also has operations in China and the Bahamas.”

“8(a) Business Development Program[edit] The 8(a) Business Development Program assists in the development of small businesses owned and operated by individuals who are socially and economically disadvantaged, such as women and minorities. The following ethnic groups are classified as eligible: Black Americans; Hispanic Americans; Native Americans (American Indians, Eskimos, Aleuts, or Native Hawaiians); Asian Pacific Americans (persons with origins from Burma, Thailand, Malaysia, Indonesia, Singapore, Brunei, Japan, China (including Hong Kong), Taiwan, Laos, Cambodia (Kampuchea), Vietnam, Korea, The Philippines, U.S. Trust Territory of the Pacific Islands (Republic of Palau), Republic of the Marshall Islands, Federated States of Micronesia, the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands, Guam, Samoa, Macao, Fiji, Tonga, Kiribati, Tuvalu, or Nauru); Subcontinent Asian Americans (persons with origins from India, Pakistan, Bangladesh, Sri Lanka, Bhutan, the Maldives Islands or Nepal). In 2011, the SBA, along with the FBI and the IRS, uncovered a massive scheme to defraud this program. Civilian employees of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, working in concert with an employee of Alaska Native Corporation Eyak Technology LLC allegedly submitted fraudulent bills to the program, totaling over 20 million dollars, and kept the money for their own use.[28]”

“Nortel Government Solutions, in collaboration with the Department of Justice (DOJ), built the Joint Automated Booking System (JABS) — a centralized system for automating the collection of fingerprint, photographic and biographic data, submitting this data to the FBI, and sharing it with participating law enforcement agencies nationwide.”

“The White House travel office controversy, sometimes referred to as Travelgate,[1][2] was the first major ethics controversy of the Clinton administration. It began in May 1993, when seven employees of the White House Travel Office were fired. This action was unusual because although theoretically staff employees serve at the pleasure of the President and could be dismissed without cause, in practice, such employees usually remain in their posts for many years.

The White House stated the firings were done because financial improprieties in the Travel Office operation during previous administrations had been revealed by an FBI investigation. Critics contended the firings were done to allow friends of President Bill Clinton and First Lady Hillary Rodham Clinton to take over the travel business and that the involvement of the FBI was unwarranted. Heavy media attention forced the White House to reinstate most of the employees in other jobs and remove the Clinton associates from the travel role.

Further investigations by the FBI and the Department of Justice, the White House itself, the General Accounting Office, the House Government Reform and Oversight Committee, and the Whitewater Independent Counsel all took place over the subsequent years. Travel Office Director Billy Dale was charged with embezzlement but found not guilty in 1995. In 1998, Independent Counsel Kenneth Starr exonerated Bill Clinton of any involvement in the matter.

Hillary Clinton gradually came under scrutiny for allegedly having played a central role in the firings and making false statements about her involvement therein. In 2000, Independent Counsel Robert Ray issued his final report on Travelgate. He sought no charges against her, saying that while some of Clinton’s statements were factually false, there was insufficient evidence that these statements were either knowingly false or that she understood that her statements led to the firings.”

“Virtual Command Center
Real-Time Tool to Securely Monitor Criminal Incidents and Major Events Online
July 3, 2012
Originally published in the July 2012 edition of the CJIS Link, Volume 14, Number 2
On April 18, federal and local officials in Clarksburg, West Virginia, announced the arrest of a major West Virginia synthetic drug supplier. Operation “Hot Stuff Cool Things” was a multi-agency operation of 70 agents that used a Virtual Command Center (VCC) on the Law Enforcement Online (LEO) network to share information about the ongoing case. Subsequently, the owner of the Clarksburg and Buckhannon stores Hot Stuff Cool Things and three other individuals were arrested on multiple federal drug charges by a task force that included the Drug Enforcement Administration, Internal Revenue Service, West Virginia State Police, U.S. Marshals Service, Clarksburg Police Department, Bridgeport Police Department, and the Harrison County Sheriff’s Office. During the raid, officers found over $750,000 in cash and bank deposits. The U.S. Attorney said that millions of dollars of bath salts (a synthetic drug commonly used as a cocaine substitute) had moved through the stores in the last year.

In the modern law enforcement environment, agencies need to share information, collaborate, and join forces to combat crime and terrorism. Often they need to post, track, and spread information across departments and jurisdictions in a quick, secure way for an investigation or for a major occurrence. To satisfy this need for safe, inclusive communication, the LEO Operations Unit created the VCC capability in 2002. The LEO VCC is a situational awareness and/or crisis management tool used to share information about street-level and tactical activities among law enforcement operations centers and command posts. Since its inception, the VCC has been used by numerous agencies for local, national, and international events ranging from major case management to global events like presidential inaugurations.

Because the VCC resides on LEO, it is extremely flexible and can be used or viewed from multiple geographic locations. This makes it feasible for federal, state, and local law enforcement agencies to create joint efforts in investigations and law enforcement actions. The VCC exists on a secure system for any designated audience members online, not just those physically present at an event or a “brick and mortar” command center. Through the VCC, law enforcement can effectively manage a tactical incident in real time, 24/7, with both operational and technical support. As the VCC receives and posts relevant information and intelligence, it provides a comprehensive account of an incident or event to designated law enforcement channels.

The VCC provides an events board feature that permits information posts as an event occurs and allows listing of data such as photographs, scanned documents, or any information that would be useful to managing an event or crisis. Agencies hosting the VCC can permit access to individual persons or entire agencies as needed. Even critical incident managers, such as emergency planners, can now have remote access to a crisis without having to be on-scene. Recent enhancements to the VCC capability include the ability to display incidents by specific dates or times, improved refresh rates on the screens, and improved critical real-time monitoring of operations.

The FBI and the law enforcement community as a whole have benefited from the increased ability to share vital information and collaborate—even over previously unmanageable locality impediments—by the creation of the VCC. In 2011, LEO members created over 300 new VCCs and opened over 700 VCC event boards to collect, record, and securely publish information. As an indication of its effectiveness and adaptability, the law enforcement community has used the VCC not only during kidnappings, shootings, and special investigations, but also during major events such as NASCAR races, Republican and Democratic National Conventions, a presidential inauguration, the Super Bowl, the Pro Bowl, the Academy Awards, and the Hurricane Katrina relief effort.”

“Duncan Duane Hunter (born December 7, 1976) is an American politician and member of the Republican Party from California who has represented San Diego County in the United States House of Representatives since 2009, representing California’s 50th congressional district. The district, numbered as the 52nd district from 2009 to 2013, covers almost all of San Diego County except for the coastal and border areas. It includes the cities of Escondido, San Marcos and Santee as well as Fallbrook, Lakeside and Valley Center and mountain and desert areas stretching to the Imperial County line.

The day after the September 11 attacks, Hunter quit his job and joined the United States Marine Corps. He attended Officer Candidates School at Marine Corps Base Quantico. Upon graduation in March 2002, he was commissioned as a second lieutenant. He subsequently served as a field artillery officer in the 1st Marine Division after the 2003 invasion of Iraq and completed a second tour in Fallujah, Iraq, in 2004, serving in Battery A, 1st Battalion, 11th Marines. During his second tour, he participated in Operation Vigilant Resolve.

In September 2005, Hunter was honorably discharged from active duty but remained in the Marine Corps Reserve. He then started a residential development company. In 2007, he was recalled to active duty and deployed to Afghanistan in support of the War in Afghanistan; this was his third tour of duty during the War on Terrorism. Hunter was honorably discharged from active duty in December 2007, but continues to serve in the Marine Corps Reserve.[9][10] Hunter was promoted to major in 2012.[11][12]

Following in the footsteps of his father, Hunter’s voting record has been decidedly conservative. He has a lifetime rating of 93 from the American Conservative Union. He is also a member of the Republican Study Committee,[32]a caucus of conservative House Republicans of which his father was a longtime member.[citation needed]

In a 2009 interview with KPBS, Hunter expressed support for “overriding” the designation of the delta smelt as an endangered species, saying that overriding it would reduce unemployment in California.[33]

He opposed the Health Care and Education Reconciliation Act of 2010, saying that it would “take away” the doctor-patient relationship and the right for people to choose “what type of operations they have”, and that it would allow a “government bureaucrat” to make health care decisions for people. In the KPBS interview, Hunter said, “Things that you have problems with now would be exacerbated if you had government-run healthcare.”[34]

At an April 2010 Tea Party movement rally in Ramona, California, Hunter advocated for the deportation of United States citizens who are the children of illegal immigrants.[35]

At the rally, Hunter said, “It’s a complex issue and … you could look and say, ‘You’re a mean guy. That’s a mean thing to do. That’s not a humanitarian thing to do’ … We simply cannot afford what we’re doing right now. We just can’t afford it. California’s going under.” He confirmed the comments to San Diego County’s North County Times, telling the newspaper that he supported House Resolution 1868, a measure that called for the elimination of birthright citizenship in the United States. He expressed support for the controversial 2010 Arizona immigration law, calling it a national security issue and “a fantastic starting point”.[36]

On July 24, 2013, Hunter voted against an amendment offered by Justin Amash to rein in warrantless domestic surveillance conducted by the NSA.[37]

In October 2013 Hunter was the only representative from San Diego County to vote against the bill ending the nation’s 16-day partial government shutdown, explaining that he voted against it because it did not reduce spending or the national debt.[38]

In February 2016, Hunter puffed on an electronic cigarette during a committee hearing, to dramatize his opposition to a proposed federal ban on such “vaping” on airplanes; however, his colleagues on the House Transportation and Infrastructure Committee approved the ban.[39]

At a town-hall-style meeting in March 2017, Hunter was confronted by protesters. Before the crowd, Hunter asserted that the American intelligence community was filled with “seditious Obama folks” who “hate Donald Trump as much as you (those at the meeting) do” and are trying to undermine the Trump administration. He also described the American government as “Orwellian”.[40]

Hunter voted in favor of the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act of 2017.[41] Hunter said that the plan is “good for most states” but “not as good” for California.[42]

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